Vibin' with Tonza

The First African-American Senior Resident Superior Court Judge in North Carolina - Cy A. Grant Sr.- Part II

February 19, 2020 Cy A. Grant Sr. Season 1
Vibin' with Tonza
The First African-American Senior Resident Superior Court Judge in North Carolina - Cy A. Grant Sr.- Part II
Chapters
Vibin' with Tonza
The First African-American Senior Resident Superior Court Judge in North Carolina - Cy A. Grant Sr.- Part II
Feb 19, 2020 Season 1
Cy A. Grant Sr.

Raised by his grandmother in the Indian Woods community of Bertie County, North Carolina, Cy A. Grant Sr. graduated from Bertie Senior High School in 1973 and went on to earn his bachelor's degree from North Carolina Central University in 1977. After working for a year as an Assistant Local Government Coordinator with the Mid-East Regional Planning Agency, Cy decided to apply to law school. Accepted into UNC School of Law and NCCU School of Law, Cy decided to remain in the environment where he felt more comfortable and went on to successfully complete law school at the NCCU School of Law in 1981.

Upon graduation from law school, Cy A. Grant Sr. worked as a judicial law clerk for The Honorable Richard C. Erwin, Federal District Court Judge for the Middle District of North Carolina. As a clerk, Cy served as the Federal Judge's personal attorney, doing his legal research, writing legal opinions, and providing advice when needed. After clerking with the Federal Judge for approximately fourteen months, Cy returned to eastern North Carolina where he became the first African-American Assistant District Attorney in the Sixth Judicial District. After two years as an Assistant District Attorney Cy, his wife, Rosiland, and Attorney W. Rob Lewis formed the law firm of Grant, Lewis & Grant in Ahoskie, North Carolina. On January 1, 1989, Cy A. Grant Sr. was sworn in as the Senior Resident Superior Court Judge for District 6B, the first African-American to hold this position in the State of North Carolina.

Twenty years ago, Judge Grant administered the oath and swore me into the practice of law in the presence of family, friends, and members of the community. I was young, impressionable and frightened to death as I thought about the responsibility I was taking on as a litigator in my home town and the surrounding areas. Having this man, a man that grew up in the same neck of the woods as me; a man that had accomplished so much throughout his career; a man that expected nothing but the best from the litigators that came before him; greatly influenced my commitment to my community and dedication to the profession.

Show Notes

Raised by his grandmother in the Indian Woods community of Bertie County, North Carolina, Cy A. Grant Sr. graduated from Bertie Senior High School in 1973 and went on to earn his bachelor's degree from North Carolina Central University in 1977. After working for a year as an Assistant Local Government Coordinator with the Mid-East Regional Planning Agency, Cy decided to apply to law school. Accepted into UNC School of Law and NCCU School of Law, Cy decided to remain in the environment where he felt more comfortable and went on to successfully complete law school at the NCCU School of Law in 1981.

Upon graduation from law school, Cy A. Grant Sr. worked as a judicial law clerk for The Honorable Richard C. Erwin, Federal District Court Judge for the Middle District of North Carolina. As a clerk, Cy served as the Federal Judge's personal attorney, doing his legal research, writing legal opinions, and providing advice when needed. After clerking with the Federal Judge for approximately fourteen months, Cy returned to eastern North Carolina where he became the first African-American Assistant District Attorney in the Sixth Judicial District. After two years as an Assistant District Attorney Cy, his wife, Rosiland, and Attorney W. Rob Lewis formed the law firm of Grant, Lewis & Grant in Ahoskie, North Carolina. On January 1, 1989, Cy A. Grant Sr. was sworn in as the Senior Resident Superior Court Judge for District 6B, the first African-American to hold this position in the State of North Carolina.

Twenty years ago, Judge Grant administered the oath and swore me into the practice of law in the presence of family, friends, and members of the community. I was young, impressionable and frightened to death as I thought about the responsibility I was taking on as a litigator in my home town and the surrounding areas. Having this man, a man that grew up in the same neck of the woods as me; a man that had accomplished so much throughout his career; a man that expected nothing but the best from the litigators that came before him; greatly influenced my commitment to my community and dedication to the profession.